The Violent Men (Rudolph Maté, USA, 1954): Finally recuperated from the Confederate bullet that blazed a trial through his torso, Glenn Ford's small ranch operator decides to return east after selling his property to the territory's greediest monopolist, a crippled, crutch-bound Edward G. Robinson....

(Budd Boetticher, USA, 1958): The most minor of the Scott/Boetticher westerns is still a blast to watch, but it remains the only one that strains from its budgetary restrictions and begs for meaner and leaner circumstances. First problem is that Scott's not a brooding loner...

(Budd Boetticher, USA, 1957): "Some things a man can't ride around." Cowboy codes don't come much simpler, more apt or eloquent than this, spoken by Randolph Scott's hostage-held cattleman Pat Brennan at the moment of decision. He's being held in high desert country by a...

(Budd Boetticher, 1956): When Lee Marvin first claps eyes on Randolph Scott in the sublime Seven Men From Now, he all but growls with devilish glee: here's a guy he can fuck with royally and endlessly and he might as well because after all he's...

(Budd Boetticher, USA, 1959): Yer dern tootin' there's some things a man can't ride around, for instance the awesome beauty and formidable precision of this elementary revenge western directed by Budd Boetticher. Featuring Randolph Scott in trim, thin-lipped retribution mode, Ride Lonesome is at once...

(Fritz Lang, USA, 1952): As determinedly weird a Hollywood western you'll find -- at least until Johnny Guitar rides in -- this patently artificial little payback drama was reportedly the result of some high-level ego clashes: producer Howard Hughes wanted it made cheaply, star Marlene...

(Sergio Corbucci, Italy, 1966): Burt Reynolds, always amusing but never the best judge of his own career, used to have a field day ridiculing this early Sergio Corbucci western on talk shows. He'd claim he went to work for "the wrong Sergio", and that it...

(Franco Giraldi, Italy, 1968): To get an idea of just how much middlebrow firepower the spaghetti western was up against in the U.S. -- and how time has tempered the ferocity -- check out this excerpt from Roger Ebert's original review of Franco Giraldi's A...

(Lucio Fulci, Italy, 1966): Somewhere in between filming Sergio Corbucci's Django and John Huston's The Bible (Between Django and The Bible -- a fine euro-western title in itself ) Franco Nero found the time to take a major horsewhipping in Lucio Fulci's Massacre Time. And we...

(Alberto de Martino, Italy, 1966): Since the name 'Django' in spaghetti westerns refers more to a kind of generic brand than a specific character -- think Coke, Kleenex or Sheiks -- one comes to expect otherwise absurd variations from one Djangler to the next. But...

(Budd Boetticher, USA, 1957): There's something wrong right from the beginning. Could that be Randolph Scott, our Randy, holding up a stagecoach? Well, not quite, as it turns out, but that twist on expectations sets the tone of off-kilter ambiguity that holds sway over the...

Comanche Station (Budd Boetticher, USA, 1958): Boetticher's final movie in the Ranown Scott cycle begins with a tense exchange: for a blanket full of trinkets and a rifle, Scott frees a captive woman (Nancy Lowe) from the Comanches and starts to take her home. Along...