(Kristian Levring, Denmark/UK/South Africa/Sweden/Belgium, 2014): Pinned somewhere between the mythic and miniature, Kristian Levring's scraped-to-the-bones revenge saga The Salvation shares many of the same essentialist ambitions as Alejandro Innaritu's The Revenant but none of its epic sweep. At 90 or so minutes, it gets its job done so quickly you...

(John Ford, U.S.A., 1956): Taking this one on board as a favourite is also to accept a certain amount of responsibility: John Ford's greatest western is also his most challenging, conflicted and torn movie, so having it around in the house is kind of like...

(Robert Mulligan, USA, 1968): Coming the blood year of Tet, My Lai and the King-Kennedy assassinations, Robert Mulligan's unseen enemy western -- about an aging scout (Gregory Peck), a formerly captive white woman (Eva Marie Saint) and her mixed-race son being pursued by the boy's...

(Alex Cox, Great Britain, 1986/2010): It doesn't get any better, and that's not meant in the sense you might hope. Despite being re-visited, re-polished, re-colored and digitally splatter-enhanced, the grim fact is that Alex Cox's seat-of-the-pants quickie spaghetti knockoff/parody remains the larky in-joke it always...

(Lambert Hillyer, USA, 1920): The title refers both to the hero Dan Kurrie's horse and the true grit required to survive in a William S. Hart western. In this liberal variation on the boilerplate good badman scenario, Hart plays an itinerant drifter who lands a...

(Lambert Hillyer, USA, 1917):  One of the first Hart vehicles credited to the former journalist Lambert Hillyer (a friend of Hart's), the movie, or what remains of it, was more likely directed by both the actor and the neophyte director. It certainly feels of a...

(John Ford, USA, 1949):  Considering the cliche about cavalry movies galloping to the rescue, the curious thing about Ford's legendary 'Cavalry Trilogy' -- of which She Wore a Yellow Ribbon is the second act -- is how little rescuing the cavalry actually does. Indeed, this...

(John Ford, USA, 1939): Monumental as the Valley and movie star it introduced -- and for introducing its director's extraordinary period of sound westerns and restoring so-called adulthood to the western -- John Ford's adaptation of a Collier's short story is nevertheless striking most for its...

(Budd Boetticher, 1956): When Lee Marvin first claps eyes on Randolph Scott in the sublime Seven Men From Now, he all but growls with devilish glee: here's a guy he can fuck with royally and endlessly and he might as well because after all he's...