(Delmer Daves, U.S.A., 1956): As Jubal Troop, a sheepherder with a murky past, Glenn Ford literally slides down a rocky slope into this movie, in which he will be the catalyst for the unleashing of all manner of Othello-inspired ugliness in this beautifully rendered Cinemascopic...

(Terrence Malick, U.K./U.S.A., 2005-8): Eden is frolicked through and fallen in each of Terrence Malick's first four movies, but never with quite the lavish determination and crashing portentousness that it does here, in Malick's gorgeous but taxing endurance test of a costume epic. He's telling the...

(2010 - ) In which the famously ill-adapted crime fiction maestro Elmore Leonard comes to TV and finally finds a happy home. That's the mythical narrative anyway. The fact is, if you consider Budd Boetticher's The Tall T,  Martin Ritt's Hombre, Frankenheimer's 52 Pickup, Jackie Brown, Out of Sight and some...

(William Wiard, U.S.A., 1980): Steve McQueen was only eight months from death when this, his second last movie was released, and Tom Horn is one level a look straight in the eye of death: McQueen, 49 when the movie was shot, was already in advanced...

(Peter Fonda, U.S.A., 1971): Peter Fonda's directorial debut was the product of Universal Studio's five-minute 'youth division' campaign, when the industry-rattling success of Easy Rider prompted a hastily initiated then promptly aborted slate of low-budget movies directed at the long-hairs. Dennis Hopper's virtually unseeable The...

(Robert Benton, U.S.A., 1972): From the moment when the coming-of-age-in-the-west movie was an especially sturdy vessel for the revisionist enterprise of stripping the mythology to its scabby shins, Robert Benton's directorial debut (co-written by David Newman) is arguably the best of the bunch: far more...

(Sergio Corbucci, Italy, 1965): Essential only for spaghetti purists and completists (guilty, I guess), Sergio Corbucci's historically noteworthy early Euro-western is interesting mostly for its early launching of certain tropes -- the handicap-afflicted gunslinger, his ritualized torture, and dreamy-strange gunfights -- than anything else. In...

(Mario Caiano, Italy/Spain, 1968): For this otherwise unusually dedicated and tolerant viewer of the euro-western, the hardest river to forge is the one where spaghetti splits into one of its most popular but (if you ask me) insufferable sub-genres, the buddy comedy, and this, about...

(Tonino Valerii, Italy/Spain, 1969): Among discerning spaghetterati, Tonino Valerii's speculative riff on the JFK assassination -- thinly disguised as an even more speculative riff on the Garfield assassination -- is held in high regard, and if inspired liberty-taking counts for anything, The Price of Power...

(Quentin Tarantino, U.S.A., 2012): As much a splattered-up invocation of a salt-and-pepper Burt Kennedy comedy as it is a neo-spaghetti western, Quentin Tarantino's slave-revenge movie is every bit as much dirty fun as you'd expect, and nowhere near as substantial or serious as the controversy...

(John Sturges, U.S.A., 1956): The presence of Borden Chase here as screenwriter may call to attention the absence of Anthony Mann as director and James Stewart as star, but the presence of John Sturges and Richard Widmark respectively is enough to ensure that Backlash, a...

(Dick Richards, U.S.A., 1972): The frontier had gotten some dirty by 1972, the year this, Bad Company, Dirty Little Billy, Ulzana's Raid, High Plains Drifter and The Great Northfield, Minnesota Raid rode in. The frontier was bleak, hard and rotten, and the people found there...